Alice, Books, Etc.

Apr 08

This blogger found Upworthy-style headlines very annoying. You’ll find his response utterly plausible | Dean Burnett | Science | theguardian.com

Apr 02

[video]

Mar 31

(via Chaneliser en équipage pour la plus grande gloire de Coco | La République Des Livres par Pierre AssoulineLa République Des Livres par Pierre Assouline)

(via Chaneliser en équipage pour la plus grande gloire de Coco | La République Des Livres par Pierre AssoulineLa République Des Livres par Pierre Assouline)

Dancing Rabbis and Bar Mitzvah Cats: On Jewish Humor in French Popular Film (via Dancing Rabbis and Bar Mitzvah Cats: On Jewish Humor in French Popular Film | La Maison Française | New York University)

Dancing Rabbis and Bar Mitzvah Cats: On Jewish Humor in French Popular Film (via Dancing Rabbis and Bar Mitzvah Cats: On Jewish Humor in French Popular Film | La Maison Française | New York University)

Mar 30

[video]

Mar 29

"Strictly business"

I recently found a reblog comment from ages ago about my use of “strictly business” (in scare quotes), so throwing this out for wider discussion.

What is acceptable/unacceptable sharing across social media when personal and professional lines cross (which is most of the time)?

No one expects automatons who only speak in approved commentary, but there must be a point when your social media profile is not a business one and you should reconsider adding it to your resume, adding it to curated lists of people who do X, etc.

Say when 90% of what you post has nothing to do with your job/study, then it’s not a professional outlet, it’s a personal one.

I’ve seen too many posts that people will come to regret. I’ve hovered over the ‘send’ button before deciding ‘nobody cares’. And we must all have encountered those pictures where you said to yourself: “wow, this person probably though only their 5 followers who they know IRL would see this, but as it’s public, now I’m watching and judging them” (and I’m talking perfectly normal pics).

At some point you need to make a decision about which person you are presenting and to whom.

Agree? Disagree?

Mar 28

pewresearch:

image

NEW: A gif map of how many executions have occurred in each state in a given year or overall since 1977, the year after the Supreme Court reaffirmed its approval of the death penalty.

For more, see our new report which finds that a shrinking majority of Americans (55%) support the death penalty for persons convicted of murder.  

(via pewinternet)

Mar 24

aeonmagazine:

Our instincts for privacy evolved in tribal societies where walls didn’t exist. No wonder we are hopeless oversharers

aeonmagazine:

Our instincts for privacy evolved in tribal societies where walls didn’t exist. No wonder we are hopeless oversharers

Mar 12

When did Google Plus start doing these mega-card link previews* and how do I get one? 
*don’t know what to call that

When did Google Plus start doing these mega-card link previews* and how do I get one? 

*don’t know what to call that

Feb 19

usnatarchives:

This World War I veteran wore his uniform to enter Santa Anita Park assembly center. He joined other people of Japanese ancestry evacuated from the West Coast during World War II.  
Dorothea Lange took this photograph on April 5, 1942. 
Just a few weeks before, on February 19, 1942, President Roosevelt had signed Executive Order 9066. The War Department used this order almost exclusively to intern thousands  Americans of Japanese descent until the order was rescinded in 1944.
Today is the Day of Remembrance for Japanese Americans interned during WWII. Read more about the Executive Order 9066 on the OurPresidents Tumblr.
Image: National Archives, 210-G-3B-424

usnatarchives:

This World War I veteran wore his uniform to enter Santa Anita Park assembly center. He joined other people of Japanese ancestry evacuated from the West Coast during World War II. 

Dorothea Lange took this photograph on April 5, 1942.

Just a few weeks before, on February 19, 1942, President Roosevelt had signed Executive Order 9066. The War Department used this order almost exclusively to intern thousands  Americans of Japanese descent until the order was rescinded in 1944.

Today is the Day of Remembrance for Japanese Americans interned during WWII. Read more about the Executive Order 9066 on the OurPresidents Tumblr.

Image: National Archives, 210-G-3B-424